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24.01.2023, Words by Billy Ward

Glastonbury Festival launches its 2023 Emerging Talent Competition

The competition gives new acts the chance to perform on one of the festival's main stages...

Glastonbury Festival is announcing the start of its Emerging Talent Competition for 2023. 

Supported by PRS for Music and PRS Foundation, the competition gives emerging UK and Ireland-based acts across the musical spectrum the chance to compete for a slot on one of the main stages at this year’s festival.

As well as performing at one of the world's most iconic festivals, the winners of the free-to-enter competition will also be awarded a £5,000 Talent Development prize. Two runners-up will also each be awarded £2,500.

Established artists such as South London rapper Flohio and singer-songwriter Declan McKenna broke through with help from the exposure they received from the competition.  

Speaking about the annual competition, Glastonbury co-organiser Emily Eavis said: “Showcasing new music is a hugely important part of what we do at Glastonbury, and the Emerging Talent Competition has helped us to discover so many incredible artists over the years. It’s amazing to be able to offer this platform to some of the brightest talent out there, and I can’t wait to hear this year’s entries!”

DMY will be helping to judge the Emerging Talent Competition this year, joining a panel of 30 of the UK’s best music writers to help compile a longlist of 90 acts. The longlist will then be narrowed down to a shortlist of eight artists by judges including Glastonbury organisers Michael and Emily Eavis, before the live finals in Pilton decide the winning act.

Acts from any musical genre can enter the 2023 competition for one week only using the form which will be available on Glastonbury Festival's website from 9am Monday January 30 until 5pm Monday February 6 2023.

To enter, acts needed to supply a YouTube link to one original song, plus a link to a video of themselves performing live (even if it’s only recorded in a bedroom).

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